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to cover so let's get right to it. russia dominating our newscast this hour. for two very different reasons. first, the man, that man you see there, russia's top diplomat, he is now taking an active role in trying to end the civil war in syria. now, remember, both russia and china have blocked u.n. attempts to force out the assad regime. now the russians say they are willing to meet with the syrian opposition. it could open the door for real u.n. action on the ground, action that could mean american involvement. we've got more details in a live report in just a minute. >>> but also, russia's president formally saying no to americans who want to adopt russian children. it is a heartbreaking development for hundreds of americans who are trying to adopt children from russian orphana orphanages. that is happening right now. president vladimir putin signed the adoption ban today. sadly, more than 50 americans who were in the final stages of adopting russian children, they are not going to be able to. and while those families certainly hoping that they're going to allow these adoptions to go thro
the subway tracks. >>> in russia, president vladimir putin signed a bill banning americans from adopting russian children. let's take a live look now from the russian embassy here in d.c. if we could. the law putin signed is reportedly in retailation for a new law in the u.s. that calls for sanctions against russian officials for human rights abuses. it takes effect january 1st and it also blocks dozens of children already in the process of being adopted by americans from leaving russia. >>> still ahead at 7:00, a closer look at the fiscal cliff fight and what it would take to get a deal done. >> plus, moving on out, after pounding the nation for days, a monster winter storm is finally losing its steam. we're going to take a look at the damage and travel delays it left behind. >> first, here's dave. >> sarah, the biggest game in decades is almost upon us. just two days away from the redskins and cowboys to decide the nc east crown. >> thank you, dave. hello. as we head to the break, live look outside. we're going to get the latest weather and traffic from tucker and jeff coming up next.
nations special envoy to syria this weekend. russia has repeatedly blocked the united nations from taking action against the syrian government but has recently taken steps to distance itself from the syrian regime. egypt's president mohammed morsi portion of voters opposed the enough constitution. he is calling for dialogue now to address the divisions that has polarized the nation and led to mass protests. still he had nothing concrete to offer his opponents. new document passed in a referendum with nearly 64% of the vote. critics say it restricts freedom and expands the influence of islamic law. president morsi and supporters says moderate democratic state in fighting depression, dictatorship, nepotism and corruption. the holiday shopping season is drawing to a close so bring on the after christmas deals and you can bet retailers will do whatever they can to get you back in their stores. because overall, holiday sales numbers are way way down. context and perspective from the fox business network ahead. plus, the healthcare overhaul. the super size drink ban, remember that. and the west
in russia. >> those poor kids. >>> want to move on to the weather. lots of snow, wind, hail everywhere across the u.s. the storm that brought snow and spun off tornadoes is still not over. ten deaths blamed on the storm. more than 2,400 flights have been canceled. it could dump more snow on new england and upstate new york today. boy, they don't need that. bonnie schneider with a look at the forecast. good morning. >> good morning. the storm we've been talking about is working its way to extreme northeastern new england. it is hitting canada hard. quebec is getting more snow. i mentioned yesterday that cold air would come in behind the system. it sure has. scranton at 26. below freezing in new york city at 31. just to let you know, it's not over yet. a brand new storm system set up these winter weather advisories for pennsylvania and into new york, washington, d.c., and the mountains of virginia. you can see also ohio slammed again after so much snow from the first system. so the way it's going to play out, saturday into sunday, this system is likely going to bring heavier snow to area
friend was appointed ambassador minister to russia come first minister to russia and he couldn't speak french at the time french was not only the language of international diplomacy, it was also the language spoken in the russian court, they spoke french to each other. john quincy could and he asked john adams can you take john quincy adams with you to st. petersburg as the secretary at 16 years of age, and john quincy adams goes up with francis to st. petersburg and spends the year up there. it was too cold to venture out. he had this insatiable appetite for running. he studied david hume, the six volumes of edward gibbons decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, the great economic work. he kept studying latin and read cicero. he read english poets. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. a 69 was still studying on goal wrigley. i went to jail instead of harvard. of course a big difference. >> but i take it as a politician especially in our modern sense of the word he may have lacked a certain common touch. >> he had no common
in foreign languages or when the family friend, francis daniel was appointed ambassador, minister to russia, our first minister to russia, he couldn't speak french at the time french was not the language of international diplomacy. there's always the language spoken in the russian court. francis couldn't speak french. young john quincy could and asked john could he take john quincy adams within two st. petersburg as secretary of litigation is 16 years of age. john quincy adams goes up two st. petersburg and spends the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really venture out. so john quincy adams on his son had the sensational appetite for learning. on his own he studied it lame history of england, six volumes of edward gibbons, decline and fall of the roman empire. adam smith's two volume work on the wealth of nations, great economic word. he kept studying latin. he read the latin poets in cicero and avenue. he read the english poet. he had this insatiable appetite for learning. at 16 i was still studying uncle wiggly. but i read it in latin because i went to heal instead o
children were shot and killed by gunman adam lanza that day. russia playing politics. putting their kids at risk. their orphans at risk. president vladimir putin has banned americans from adopting russian children. the move reportedly is in response to human rights violations handed down by president obama earlier this year -- earlier this month rather. putin's new law destroying the dreams of many american families currently in the process of adopting, including this. >> they were already our family. we already had their names. we were already decorating their room. it's really. [crying] >> are you crying? it? >> is so disturbing, this story. 1,000 russian children were adopted by americans last year. children are disabled. not wanted by anybody else in russia. living in orphanages. not available for adoption. a the love these families have gotten really close to the adoption. set everything up and can't go pick up the kids. horrible. anyway, a maryland pizza delivery man fights off a group of attackers. his reward? a demotion. >> he sucker punched me. my glasses flew off. i dropped the
push to end the bloody war in syria. russia's foreign minister and the u.n. envoy, for syria are meeting today and both are calling for a a long-sd piece initiative that calls for a transitional government leading to elections. this meeting coming as new violence erupts between government and rebel forces. that violence has left dozens dead. in fact so far the death toll, it was at 40,000 and it now supposedly topped 45,000. but we are having a meeting this weekend between that u.n. envoy for syria and russia's foreign minister. they will be discussing this plan for a transitional government and we're going to talk more about that right now with fox news military analyst general jack keane, a four-star general and former vice chief of staff of the army. thank you for joining us, general. >> good to be here, patti ann. patti ann: back in june the world powers in geneva came up with this proposal for a unity government. both the assad regime and the opposition rejected it because it would involve the two sides sharing power. now they want to revive the plan but is it desirable?
by the end of february. >> in russia, a bill banning american citizens from adopting russian children has won final approval from parliament there. >> president vladimir putin has already hinted he will sign it. angry citizens gathered in front of parliament to protest. they say children should not become victims of politics. the ban 1 unanimous support in the upper house of parliament. moscow sees the bill of -- as retaliation. all of us have been to london know and love the city's uniquely spacious yet somewhat old-fashioned black cabs. they are as much a part of the british capital as the big ben on the tower bridge. >> no wonder then there was a huge outcry when back in october the company making those calves filed for bankruptcy. what's worse, the london taxi company had to recall a large number of the calves once renowned for their reliability. -- a large number of the tabs -- cabs once renowned for their reliability. >> not all the caps on the streets of the traditional black cabs and more. martin has driven a taxi in london for 18 years. he would rather not give his last name because
about the impact. >> arthel: we have new details of the deadly plane crash out of russia. police say that four crew members are dead and four others have been injured after an airliner slammed into the international airport overshooting the runway and crashed into a nearby highway. officials say the plane which can carry up to 210 passengers was empty as it was on its way from the czech republic. they are looking into whether a powerful snowstorm may be to the blame. >> thousands of firefighters across the u.s. and canada are traveling to western new york to attend the memorial services for two fallen heroes. they were shot and killed on crime eve. the shooter killed himself at scene and had served 17 years in prison for killing his mother. a woman allegedly helped purchase the weapon. the community is coming together that all the visiting firefighters have a place to stay. many of them will be staying at hampton inn there for free. >> gregg: new developments in the investigation of a subway shoving death in new york city. police saying a woman is in custody after she made statements
others. >> russia's president could soon decide if americans should be ban from adopting russian children. the government voted in favor of such a ban. russian activists say it deprives children of the chance to leave orphanages. it's a response to a united states law calling for sanctions against russia. >>> today marks the 8th anniversary of the quake and tsunami. survivors held prayer services. the un called it the worst natural disaster to hit thailand. tsunami's went through 14 countries. 200,000 people died. >> we are back on storm watch this day after christmas. mark is tracking a fast moving storm that has produced plenty of rain. >> and we check the return polesis of major stores. what you need to know before you return that unwanted gift. >> here is a look at bridge. you can see it's wet. we will let you know where we had spin outs this morning coming up next. . >>> this is known as boxes day in places like canada. it's become a huge shopping day similar to black friday here in the united states. the malls in england and canada are already packed with shoppers. box i
accounts. they have detected hundreds of computers with sophisticated malware manufactured in russia. >> it will activated and what it does it replicates or clones your pc on serve they are russia. once they clone your pc they try to log into the bank using those credentials. >> they say the plan likely involves target people of high net worth but all customers are advised to make sure their anti-virus software is working. >> here is jane king with this morning's business report. >> a source says bloomberg two dozen companies are bidding for all of abrupt hostess brand. it may bad news for jealous spouses, judiciary committee that would make it a crime for companies to make stalking apps by locations of cellphone. if you are looking for a jobs, online ads recruiters rely on social websites to find better offers. >> are you feeling generous this holiday season? answer is more likely to be yes if you are guy. a new survey 31% of women plan to spend less on holiday gifts. only 19% of men felt that way. i'm jane king with the bloomberg business report. >>> and royal news, the queen and d
had received a bundle of letters from schoolchildren in russia. and it reminded me that there was an incident in russia years ago where a gunman went into a schoolhouse and wantonly killed children and the monsignor was so touched by it, but that's the way this event has touched the world. i will tell you that this is a strong town, and you can feel the people of this community pulling together to support the survivors and thinking about how they can rebuild the town and its spirit. the first selectwoman said so pointedly the other night at the interfaith service that we will not allow this event to define newtown, connecticut, and they will not. but the families of those who have been lost have been changed forever. and it's in that regard that i particularly want to thank my colleagues for this resolution of condolence and support. i want to thank my colleague, senator reid, for the moment of silence yesterday in this chamber. in my faith tradition, when you visit a house of mourning, one of the customs is for the visitor to sitilently with the mourners. d it's ve
of diplomatic activity. then he went to russia yesterday. he was meeting with russian foreign minister. russia is one of the key players of what goes on in syria because they have supported the syrian regime and now it looks like that support may be lessening in the last few weeks but still what you heard yesterday was an appeal, an urgent appeal for these two men for both sides to come together to come to a transitional process in syria and here's more of what he hlav had to say. >> translator: we encourage the syrian leadership to make as clear as possible the declared readiness with the opposition and to underline that they are open to discuss a wide variety of things in the framework of the geneva agreements reached on june 30th. >> alison, two big problems with this. when it comes to the geneva plan, no idea what role he might play and the opposition has responded to many of these calls saying they're willing to form a transitional government but not willing to work with anybody in the regime. >> they met in moscow yesterday and they're warning the conflict that it's getting more sectaria
be expected on saturday. >> thank you very much. >>> american families adopt hundreds of children from russia each year. today a new sign the russian government could soon ban all of those adoptions entirely. russia's president vladimir putin weighing in on the matter today. what his decision could mean for the children waiting to join families right here in the united states. >>> and the latest on the condition of former president george h.w. bush after his spokesperson confirmed "a series of setbacks" have put the president in the intensive care unit. we are live outside the hospital. stay close. >>> family and friends now visiting the former president george h.w. bush who is hospitalized in houston, texas. doctors moved president bush to the intensive care unit after a series of setbacks including a fever and cough that were not going away. the president is the oldest live willing former leader of our nation at age 88. but today in his e-mail to his staff he suggested the president is not on his death bed. he said "president bush would ask me to tell you to please put the harps back in the
? >> reporter: the key for syria is russia and iran and there are indications now that russia may be open to some kind of deal and it is not for any altruistic region but they're trying to preserve what little influence they have inside syria. that is a key russian ally and they would be like to be on the forefront of brokering a deal rather than syria totally fall in the hands of jihadists and somebody risch shuns have no influence on. one of the reasons they may start to talk about the deal is high level defection. this was the general in charge of the military police. when he defected over to turkey it is very nasty thing to say about the regime and president assad because he is now joining the rebels. this is may be why the russians are starting to think about talking to people. there are report that is the syrian deputy foreign minister now in moscow for talks possibly trying to negotiate some kind of settlement, some kind of transition. how that would look where it would be anrd early transition rather than this civil war pushing out what is left with the regime whether that would b
to considering how serious russia and syria have been as allies the last couple years. look what is going on the ground. a general in charge of the military defense group, the military police there inside of afghanistan, inside of syria, pardon me, he just redecked over to turkey and is joining the rebels. this is the most serious high-ranking defects we've seen in a while. that shows another part of the momentum turning toward the rebels, away from the government who are becoming increasingly isolated inside of their cities, unable to project power. the army we heard is running out of supplies, though russia is still resupplying them as of now. but the rebels are becoming increasingly successful with their attacks. the big wildcard if russia tries to figure out a way to negotiate a settlement, what does iran do? iran is the other big supporter of syria as we reported for a long time. they sent numbers of airliners, civilian cargo planes into damascus and other airports with weapons on board, men, members of the revolutionary guard to help syria, the question is russia begins to abandon s
, england -- went back home for a bit, back to russia, impossible to ground the man at a time when the money that goes along with those kinds of states that's put to immediate use. we knew that 20 # million are affected by the floods, and we know that transparency international, 70% of the world bank money given for dam maintenance was siphoned off. it doesn't take anyone, really, to guess where that money went. you know, this is a president who was called mr. 10% in the first time, mr. 50% in the wife's second term, and now during his term, mr. 110%, and that's, you know, the corruption is not according to me or pakistani sources, but it's according to john burns of the new "new york times" that places the corruption at $2 billion to $3 billion. >> so you don't approve? >> i wouldn't vote for him, no. [laughter] >> this, of course, has been the struggle and the tragedy of pakistan over a long period of time that when something like democratic elections occur, the sighfullian leaderships that take office fail the mandate that brought them there, and they often fail in space that's pinched an
of modern totalitarianism, first not see germany and now communist russia. and on like chambers, we believe that the united states would eventually turn back the communist threat to western civilization, just as surely as it had done to the equally evil threat posed by not to germany. not, mind you, that we underestimated the might of the soviet military or the strength and the resolve of the anti anti-communist forces. against as both at home and abroad. in fact, there were times when we came close to a feeling that chambers and other conservative anti-communist like james vernon who wrote a book entitled suicide of the last, we feared that they might be right. for me, one especially discouraging occasion was the fight against ronald reagan's decision in 1983 to station medium-range misfiles in europe to counter the soviet buildup of similar misfiles on its side of the dividing line between its domain and the west. massive protests were planned here at home and all over the world with the biggest one scheduled for the aid to which over a million people from every country in western europe
or three books and notepad and if for instance it is the week before the invasion of russia, mid june of 1941, i've got all the diaries piled up next to one chair, another of all the recollections, speeches churchill may have made, telegrams to roosevelt, warnings to stalin. and i approached it and i told bill phillips this -- host: your editor? guest: yes, my editor bill tphreupls. as if i was making a quilt. and i think this got a little off in the "new york times" artic article, that i would focus on that story that week, the invasion of russia. well, there was always something else happening that week, too. now we've two or three stories that have to be intertwined and i can't go down too far in the road to august of 1941 with the russian front and ca come all the way back to june 20 then go down to august with the african front. it wouldn't work. so, a read a lot. i bought harriman's memoirs. bill man westchester, in his notes, would xerox a page and cut out a little paragraph and 50 pages later you may find another paragraph from harriman's family worries but there was no contex
, it is the week before the invasion of russia, june 1941, i have all the diaries piled up next to one share. all of the recollections, the speeches churchill may have made, the telegrams to roosevelt, the warnings to stalin -- i approached it and i told bill phillips -- >> as your editor. >> my editor, bill phillips, as if i was making a quilt. this got a little off in the " new york times" article, but focusing on that week, the invasion of russia, there is always something else happening that week, so now we have two or three stories that have to be intertwined, and you cannot go too far down the road into august with the russian front and then come all the way back to june 20 again and then go all the way down to august with the african front and -- it would not work. so i read a lot. i bought the memoirs. bill manchester in his notes had xeroxed a page and cut out a paragraph. 50 pages later you might find another paragraph from the memoirs. but there is no contrast -- what team before and what came afterward. clearly bill wanted to paraphrase something from that excerpt, which kind of point
policies. >> on the outside there. >> what about china's book, continental border with russia? what about china buying to siberia. i'm colonizing siberia, sending out some of these people -- how to separate the united states? how does that worry the united states? actually, china getting stronger unaccounted siberia? >> i haven't heard any proposals for china to buy parts of siberia. [laughter] their border issues, but i haven't heard any proposals. investment -- well, the united states very much once a prosperous china, but we also want a prosperous china that assumes greater responsibilities and engagement throughout the world commensurate with the capabilities and economic power. we don't want china simply to grow and take a free ride or get a free ride on everything else that's happening around the world, that china needs to set the intake are responsible when managing international affairs, with its conflicts in africa to the middle east, to north korea and elsewhere. so we are seeing some of that already. there is good cooperation on many issues, including afghanistan, engagement wi
assume you were talking about soviet russia and nazi germany. were these regimes possible because of the uniformity? if that is the case, how did the myriad number of protestant denominations in the united states provide a unique defense against tyranny? >> i would not say -- i was not referring to just the soviet union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are r
and its embattled president. russia is offering a bleak outlook on how things might end for president assad. they said they were preparing to evacuate thousands of russian citizens from the country. with rebel forces closing in on the capital, damascus, richard engel witnessed firsthand the tough fighting still being waged in the larger city of aleppo. >> reporter: the syrian regime appears to be cracking but the rebels remain outgun and unable to protect civilians, especially in aleppo. an ancient once-bustling city the size of chicago. we followed a rebel fighter. we're going to go to one of your sniper positions. he runs across intersections exposed to government fire and joins his unit. they peek around corners, fire at government soldiers. and shout insults at them. "i joined this revolt because of the tyranny and for religion, because for 40 years we have been oppressed" says this sniper, who painted furniture before the war. the fighting has left this once beautiful city devastated. historic mosques destroyed, bread lines, gas shortages, power outages. this was one of the only
a tiny fraction of this to deal with china or russia t our nuclear arsenal isn't stopping iran from trying to achieve its nuclear weapon. these are sad, missed opportunities to right size the military which will still be the most powerful in the world by far. for us to deal with veterans' needs. mr. mcgovern: additional one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. blumenauer: for us to deal with the threats that we face today, to deal with the damage that we have done in the misguided war in iraq. to be able to deal meaningfully with the guard and ready reserve that should be upgraded and healed from the damage that was inflicted upon him. we can provide far more real security, save tax dollars, deal with the needs of veterans that are about to be, sadly, undercut , and provide balance to our budget. because, in fact, the fiscal instability for reckless -- from reckless bills like that is in fact a national security threat. we are no longer going to be able to pay almost half the world's entire military budget. we should start by rejecting this authorization
? because we've seen reports about, you know, wealthy migrants and specialists visas, coming to russia and the chinese who. are the people that are happy to buy? >> it makes a very, very small -- buying in the streets in central london. >> you might be right. >> so that's not the market. certainly not the figures that land registry are talking about there in terms of a slowdown. the slowdown is it's sort of normal people working here, including overseas. we rely on a large overseas highly skilled professional contingent who are here, or educated here. and they're the people who are either -- buying and trying to get their first homes, or sort of moving up. it's very little to buy. >> how different is the short-term prognosis for the long-term? you sponsored this report. michael ball in business school, who said that in the end, property prices in particular were meant to go nowhere but up. why is he arguing that? >> the issue is that london is a growing city and we want it to grow and the economy to grow. the fact that we're not building, the green belt is constraining us, so we've got
of resolution to this war in syria that has lasted nearly two years long. russia a big supporter of the bashar al-assad, the russian foreign minister met with secretary clinton in bu dublin. she felt the meeting upbeat thinking there may be a come proeu myself in th compromise in the future. right now there is nothing concrete and syrians continue to die. >> reporter: with every step forward the opposition makes in syria it raises concerns that a cornered president bashar al-assad could be more likely to use those chemical weapons that are apparently loaded and ready to drop. lieutenant general tom mcnerney is a fox news military analyst and served as vice chief of staff of the united states air force. thanks so much for being here. intelligence reports suggest that bashar al-assad is making moves to putting together and readying these chemical weapons. you'll remember that president obama in august said that he would consider that a red line, and the u.s. would have to get involved if bashar al-assad were to do that. do you think that the u.s. stance is the same today? >> well, i think it is,
. >>> also new this morning, russia's parliament approved a controversial measure that will ban american families from adopting russian children. according to russian media reports. that goes to president putin to be signed into law this is seen as retaliation for a new u.s. law that imposes travel and economic restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. >>> it was a black christmas? initial holiday numbers not very good. a report from master card said holiday sales growth slowed by more than half this year, and the weakest holiday shopping season since 2008. the report said shoppers were not in a subpoenai inspending m of the fiscal cliff threat and hurricane sandy. >>> box office gold for les miserables. it blew away all expectations. raking in $18 million on opening day. strong number one. and number two, jangle on chains, starring jamie fox and leonardo decap icaprio. and then the hob bot, parental guidance and jack reacher. >>> in the next half hour, we'll preview some of the top picks with christopher john farley of speak easy. "the wall street journal's" culture website. we'll
. >>> this is what happens when you park illegally in russia. we just found this video. a great big truck with a great big claw picking up a car. it seems sensible. seems like a reasonable ex expenditure expenditure. >> where does it go? >> immediately in the back of the truck. >> to immediately strip it down. >> hopefully to recycling. welcome back to "cbs this morning," everyone. >>> a suburban newspaper is in the middle of controversy after it put up everyone's name and address who has a gun permit. >> it quickly spread around the internet. as jim axelrod reports, critics say it's too much information. >> reporter: driving through this typical westchester neighborhood, you can tell a lot, who's got a new car, who just finished their addition who's got the best christmas ornament ornaments. now thanks to this website you also might fwhoe has a handgun. it began as an 1,800-world article in this past sunday's edition of "the journal news" that covers three counties. included in the article included a map with names and addresses of those likely to own a handgun in
? >> in 2013? >> yes. >> i suppose i get around to see more of europe. i would love to go to russia and see moscow and st. petersburg. >> don't go in the wintertime, that's all i can say. >> and yours? >> i used to do all the die hard type travel adventure stuff and now i just want a nice beach. mall tease you can never go wrong or the greek islands. i've never tried that yet. so that has to go on the list, as well. >> sounds good. >> for the weekend, quick jump to italy. >> i still haven't been at all. so add me to that list. i'd go anywhere. >> you can join christian and the family. >> thank you for the invite. i'm looking forward to it. >> sicily sounds beautiful. >> on that note, we would like to know where you are heading this year, greece, bangkok? dividually, too. us and reach us now that instagram is changing its policies, we'll see what its users will look like next year. >> i need to get on instagram, as well. i can't type on it. writing takes me 200,000 years. anyway, christian, next year, 2013, what type of a year do you think we'll get? >> well, 13 is not a lucky number, but i
is apparently moving its chemical weapons. now, of course is a red line for nato and the u.s. and even russia is concerned about this, saying if you use chemical weapons, then the international community will have to respond. already 40,000 dead in syria. >> in iran, they have apparently captured another of our drones. >> they claim they brought down a scan eekle on the ground the zone. it's a small surveillance drone generally used to watch their own ships not an armed drone. if iran brought it down, the u.s. will see that as an aggressive action. last month they tried to shoot one down in the same place. ayear ago iran claimed to have brought down a more technical drone. >> cenk: that is three different instances of at least firing or capturing one of our drones. the last time the americans said no absolutely not, one of our drones just happened to get lost. later, they said yeah, ok, that was our drone. by the way we want it back from iran. we're just flying an illegal drone over your air space would you give i did back to us. iran said no. take a look at this map. look at our bases and fl
into a global conflict lasting seven years, involve england, franch, austria, russia, prussia, and dozen other nations fighting for control over colonies in north america, africa, asia, and the seas in between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or tw
balance between the united states and russia under new start force levels would be stable except, of course, for the huge diversity or disparity, i would say in tactical nuclear weapons that russia enjoys. but under the stability there would be no incentives to strike first during a crisis nor would there be incentives to grow our respective nuclear arsenals in the future. we should, therefore, think very carefully before we contemplate any changes to long-standing u.s. nuclear deterrence policies or pursue further reductions in support of the president's disarmament agenda. we absolutely cannot know for certain that fewer numbers of weapons will make us safer. in fact, henry kissinger and brent scowcroft recently reminded us -- quote -- "that strategic stability is not inherent with low numbers of weapons. indeed, excessively low numbers could lead to a situation in which surprise attacks are conceivable." policy-makers would do well to heed the advice of winston churchill, offered in his last address to the united states congress. "be careful," he said. "above all things not to
the military and this large defection we had today. the other being support from russia. the two other elements that still remain in place, however, keeping him there, are thal away community, the minority shiite community assad comes from are still in place and a supporter as well as the iranian have a regime. -- regime. we're getting closer and the news of the general defecting is one step closer to the imminent collapse of the assad regime. >> we're talking about this videotape we just mentioned and all of a sudden up this advantage in the propaganda war fought inside syria as well. another blow i would think to the assad regime. >> right, not only do you have the general defecting saying i no longer want to be part of this gang military but he's switching sides, giving us the almost inside tip as to whether the opposition is not only gaining but is about to win. i think when they're switching sides and going to the winning team, we can almost predict this is a very soon we're going to see a collapse of the regime. >> he's not just leaving, his switching sides. >> publicly. >> neil: right, p
of russia. police now say that four crew members are dead, and four others have been injured after an airliner landing into one of moscow's international airports, overshot the runway and crashed into a nearby highway. take a look what happened. officials say the the plane, which has the capacity of carrying up to 210 passengers was empty, as it was on its way home from the czech republic. the cause of the crash is unknown, but officials are looking into whether a powerful snowstorm into the area may be to blame, we will keep you posted. >> hundreds of firefighters from across the united states and canada heading to webster, new york, for a second day, for the wake and funeral services of these two fallen heroes you're looking at. the two volunteer firefighters were killed in a christmas eve ambush when they responded to a house fire and gunned down by 62-year-old william spa spankler and police arrested a woman for purchasing the gun. and they're making sure that the visiting firefighters have a place to say. hampton inn in webster expecting between 100 and 150 of the firefighters
a fatal plane crash in russia. new video surfacing of the airliner as it careened off the runway and on to a highway in moscow yesterday. the impact sending debris flying into oncoming traffic, including a tire that slammed into a car. no passengers were on board at the time only crew members and the death toll risen to five after a flight attendant. the remaining three survivors listed in mythical or serious condition. hospitalized tonight. no injuries listed of people on the ground. including that car. and investigators are trying it determine what went wrong and one official is looking at faulty brakes to blame for the crash. two teenagers injured at a stabbing in a shopping mall in california at least one of them undergoing surgery the at a local hospital right now. and police responding to the scene late last night to find the victims on the third floor of a movie theater. it was chaos in the search for the suspect. >> they had us all in a line exiting, police caution tape. >> and police were shopping every vehicle and shining flashlights, opening trunks and checking everyon
numbers were being sent to russia to die. when the germans surrendered and the japanese were pushed back to their home island, the american propensity to save the human lives while wasting cheaper bullets and bombs reached its zenith with the dropping of the two atomic bombs. virtually all of the relevant evidence, recent evidence from both american and japanese sources nowadays president harry truman's decision to drop both bombs. japanese leaders did not display the slightest acknowledgment of military reality, illustrated by the report of a doctor. japan's top atomic scientist who was sent down to the regime of the following day and he had to report back to the emperor. and he was asked was this an atomic bomb? yes, it's an atomic bomb. then came the line, how long till we get when? it's hardly the response of somebody looking for a way to surrender. truman intended to show japan that he would use any weapon at our disposal. there was no atomic diplomacy. he wanted to show the japanese that it was surrender or die. when japan 70, came the victory of the principles of american exceptio
in southern russia of some significance in 1774. so there must of had a lot of troops left over. they were approached obviously early in 1775. by june 1775, there is a report in one of the virginia newspapers that the crown was tried to hire russians. and they thought that -- that they had arranged, but it fell apart in the autumn of 1775, partly because frederick the great was telling catherine the great not to do it. and they were not fond of the notion of letting troops to go through german territory. at any event, it did not happen. after that, they had to turn to there werens -- the haiti about 50,000 german mercenaries, not all of the same time. >> i am jumping here, but, in the end, why do the patriots win? >> i think they won partly because it was such a challenge for the british from the start, the logistics' were enormously difficult, the number of the ships they needed, the number of troops. they did not have them. but even more than that, you had 13 colonies, large population, a number of them -- they had a lot of people who fought in previous wars. the british were not able to
occasionally to rent out. they had a war in southern russia of some significance in 1774, so they must of had a lot of troops left over that they had organized for that. they were approached early in 1775. by june of 1775 there's a report in one of the virginia newspapers that the crown is trying to hire russians. they thought they had it arranged, but it's all part then -- but it fell apart in the autumn of 1775 partly because frederick the great was telling catherine the great not to do it. there were not friendly to the notion of letting troops go through german territory. in any event, it did not happen. after that, they had returned to the hessians. they came from a number of german states. probably a total of 50,000 german mercenaries during the revolution all and all. >> in the end, why did the colonists or why did the patriots went? -- win? >> i think they won partly because it was such a challenge for the british. from the british the logistics were enormously difficult. the number of ships they needed, the number of troops, but did not have them. even more than that, you had 13 colo
there in the capital of damascus. russia, though, is continuing to protect syrian president bashar al assad. obviously, that is the transitional plan that something along the lines of what the rebels would endorse would have assad leaf in the beginning -- leave in the beginning. this june peace plan put forth out of geneva calls for a transitional government, a new constitution and then elections. i don't think there's anybody that has much of a hope of that happening. the only thing that may change the russians' minds is they look at a chance the regime in syria is going to totally collapse meaning russia would lose all of its influence in what was one of its strongest allies around the world. russia may begin to maneuver in the back end solely in their best interests, not necessarily in the best interests of the syrian people. and as we're seeing, the syrian people are really under very, very tough conditions as evidenced by how many of them are fleeing their own country. on the turkish border now 150,000 refugees, that number is now growing exponentially, also on the jordanian border. and each pers
, everyone, russia's vladimir putin, now banning the adoption of russian children by americans as of january 1, even halting the adoptions already in progress dealing an emotional blow to many families including our next guest. robert and kim summers are parents in the process of adopting a russian child and they're afraid they'll never see him again. robert and kim, good morning to both of you. >> good morning. >> dave: i'm sorry what you're going through and what the russian president is doing is despicable to say the least. you were so close, felt it was a part of your family, tell me how difficult it's been. >> you can't fathom the pain, it feels like losing your child. this is our son and we have spent so many-- so much time waiting to get to this happy point and as a matter of fact, i looked at my husband this morning and said two weeks to go and we'll be in russia holding our son. and now that's so-- we don't know where we're at. >> dave: robert. in terms of the process and in terms of the emotional commitment, tell me how far along you are in this process. >> emotionally we're draine
there was so much going on in the world with the arab spring, with the protests in russia, on wall street that there was something in the air. that we've seen all through this year that some spirit of rebellion, some spirit of rebellion against the establishment and i wanted to try to tap into that. >> rose: tim cook was a finalist was he? >> tim cook came by for an interview last week. part of it was animated by the fact that steve jobs famously bemoan it had fact that he was never person of the year and i thout -- rose: why wn't ? >> well, i guess the timing was never right he thought he was going to be person of the year in 1984. that the computer was going to be the thing of the year and i thought about steve last year but, of course, he died during the year. we've never put a dead person as person of the year before and i didn't think that was a great -- >> rose: so you missed the opportunity so therefore -- >> so therefore i thought -- i wanted people to look at tim cook. he's had an hay maizing year, he's doubled the market cap of apple since steve died. the number ofaches over the
were there. australia, russia, italy, france. england, germany. all over the world. following this story. all the major networks were there. you know, cnn was there, of course. and so this is an international event. and so the churches have a particular role when something like this happens. that is to help people make some kind of sense of it. when it first happened, everyone, including me was in a state of complete shock. i heard, i'm the same as anyone else, a sense of sickening sense of how could this possibly happen. and you try to wrap your mind around it. and comprehend that you can't, it's just impossible. even the ways that we typically try to understand events like this through psychology and they say the man was disturbed and things like that. he certainly was. but in a war, you can understand the cultural and political tensions like this, for a natural disaster this goes way beyond that. even a very sick mentally ill individual, could never just because of that, commit a crime so horrendous. so you're thrown back, on religious concepts, that's the only way to under
. though russia has perpetrated one of the most disgraceful deceits in the history of international relations the united states will continue to respect the charter of the united nations and its fleet will honor the ordinary rules of decency but let this be known, the u.s. blockade against defensive arms shipments to cuba will continue until the russians abandon their nefarious build-up of missile sites on the island. megyn: the cuban missile crisis may have been the high point of america's struggle with russia to be the world's dominant superpower. and the united states has come to own the title pretty much by itself in the recent years. but a new report shows that dominance may be in danger and the u.s. could lose its status as the world's only superpower. am boos door john bolton, former united nations ambassador. i don't know that we. the new report from the national intelligence council, from within the office of national intelligence, james clapper, said the u.s. will not longer be the only world superpower in the next 18 years by 2030, why not? >> let me say this the exercise
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